Can Music Scales Convey Specific Emotions? (Chords)


I always wondered if scales have the power to make us feel specific emotions if let say the major scale always sounds happy or if it’s possible also to make it sound sad? What If found is that:

Scales are not limited conveying a specific set of emotions; instead, the way a musical scale is used is much more important than the type of scale. The following elements contribute to a song’s emotion: melody, pitch, tonality, volume, tempo, rhythm, instruments, harmony, performance style.

What Is a Musical Scale?

A Musical scale is a series of notes put together in a specific order. The most common scales in music are called major and minor. Also, most popular western scales have seven notes. All western scales are based on the stepwise pattern, which is structured by a combination of half and whole steps.

What Is a Mode in Music?

Let’s start from the beginning: There are 7 different notes in a single octave, and we use these 7 notes to form scales. Each scale has a different amount of flats and sharps or none at all. Also all scales are formed from half steps (semitones) and whole steps (two semitones).

Now, each of the seven notes can be used as a root note (home note) of an ascending sequence; each sequence is what call a mode of that key,

In plain English, a mode is a form of scale. Some examples are the D Dorian mode, or the C Mixolydian mode.

I almost hear you asking, “but why don’t we refer to all the modes as scales, and why do we have to distinguish the two?”

Actually, in the past, I also had the same question, but this is what I found out after I did some research: 

“A mode is a type of scale, all modes are scales, but not all scales are modes. An example would be the pentatonic scale, which is not a mode.”

The Definition of a Mode

Therefore a simple way of thinking about modes is that: Modes are ‘scales’ that start and finish on different degrees (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc) of a given scale, such as the major scale. That’s it! This is achieved by changing our starting note.

There are 7 different modes:

  • Ionian: Ionian is the same as a major scale
  • Dorian: Lower the 3rd and 7th notes a semitone
  • Phrygian: Lower the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th notes a semitone
  • Lydian: Raise the 4th note a semitone
  • Mixolydian: Lower the 7th note a semitone
  • Aeolian: Lower the, 3rd, 6th, and 7th notes a semitone
  • Locrian: Lower the 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 6th, and 7th notes a semitone

How Many Scales Are There?

Trying to determine how many scales there are in music, you might think that’s because we have 12 notes; we also have 12 scales…Well, Not exactly.

The total sum is a HUGE number, that’s why It’s quite hard to answer this question, but what I can tell you is that there are more than 1000 scales and that is only in western music! I will try my best and list as many scales as I can for you! Just scroll down to the end of this post to view my list.

For now, let’s consider the following: 

There are 12 major scales and 24 minor scales. 

Why 24? Because there are two different types of minor: 

  1. Harmonic Minor
  2. Melodic Minor

So far, we have a total of 36 major and minor scales. That is a lot of scales BUT our journey doesn’t end here…We also must consider all the modes that exist. 

(If you don’t know what a mode scroll up to the beginning of this post since we already talked about what modes are and how they are formed)

Lastly, we will include all the scales that are not created just by seven notes, and I must prepare you, the list is HUGE!

We would have to include all:

  1. 3-note Scales
  2. 4-note Scales
  3. 5-note Scales
  4. 6-note Scales
  5. (7-note Scales)
  6. 8-note Scales
  7. 9-note Scales
  8. 10-note Scales
  9. 11-note Scales and
  10. 12-note Scales

Adding them all up does give us the whooping number of 1718 musical scales!

Note: We explore ONLY the scales that exist within the 12 notes we use in western music. If we had to include all the scales that exist in the world, we would probably have an infinite number!

This is mind-boggling, right?

PRO TIP: scroll down to the end of this article to see the HUGE scale list I prepared for you.

Do Certain Scales Convey Spesific Emotions?

This is a much-heated debate if specific scales convey specific emotions. The short answer is it depends, scroll down to read the long answer.

From my recent research, I have discovered that scales are not limited to conveying a specific set of emotions; instead, the way a musical scale is used is much more important than the type of scale.

To get a clear example of what I’m talking about listen to the following three songs, 

  • Enter Sandman by Metallica
  • Happy by Pharell Williams
  • Mad World performed by Gary Jules

All three songs are in a different genre but also written in the same key/scale. As you may have noticed, even if they share the same scale, they all have a VERY different emotional palet.

If musical scales alone had such a high impact upon the emotions we feel, then the emotional canvas of these three songs would at least be somewhat similar.

Actually It’s less about if scales convey emotions and more about the different possibilities that are presented when using a different type of scale. 

To western ears, some note combinations may sound more interesting when other combinations may appear ordinary. But with the right craftsmanship, a skilled songwriter can even make the C major scale seem new and refreshing, even if its one of the most used scales there is.

How Is Emotion Created in Music?

But what happens then? If the musical scale does not determine what we should feel, what does? 

Well, I believe that the emotional range of a song is much dependent upon the following elements:

  1. Performance style
  2. Tempo
  3. Selection of instruments
  4. The “feeling” of the singer
  5. The melody line
  6. Pitch
  7. Tonality
  8. Volume
  9. Rhythm
  10. The chords (underlying harmony) we use for our song

Mainly I have come to understand that chords and melody are the two major determining factors when it comes to emotion in music. Bellow, we will talk about different aspects and uses of both major and minor chords.

This Is Why Minor Chords Sound Sad

You may have heard before that minor chords sound sad and major chords sound happy. In my mind, I always thought major and minor chords, as two separate entities, often I would write a happy song in major and an emotional song in minor. 

But recently, I discovered a more interesting approach that is based on the Moser dictionary of music.

In the Moser dictionary of music: A minor chord is described as a major chord that is clouded by the minor. That’s also why (according to Moser) we perceive the minor third as a clouded major third. That is; a major third which no longer possesses the leading-tone-tension major chords have. 

A funny way of describing the minor chord is as a suppressed or depressed major chord. 🙂

This Is How Even Major Chords Can Sound Sad

Let’s now explore something weird, the fact that sometimes even major chords can sound rather sad. 

A major chord can sound sad when its used as the dominant chord (V) in a minor piece of music. When this happens, the contrast we would normally experience from that specific major chord is masked or faded.

Her is an example:

1) These are the first 5 note of the C minor scale:

C, D, E♭, F, G,

First 5 note of the C minor scale

2) And these are the chords that are formed from these notes:

Cm, Dm, E♭, Fm, Gm,
i ii III iv v

C minor scale first 5 chords

3) Lets now take a chord progression. I will use the popular i,iv,i,v progression, in the key of C minor. It consists of the following chords:

Cm, Fm, Cm, Gm
i iv i v

i,iv,i,v progression, in the key of C minor

4) Now let’s replace the dominant minor chord (v) with the parallel dominant major chord (V).

Cm, Fm, Cm, G
i iv i V

i,iv,i,V progression, in the key of C minor with a dominant V chord

As you can hear the result is a minor chord progression with sad major dominant chord! I have included two examples in the style of a House track bellow.

A full production example of a Cm, Fm, Cm, Gm (i iv i v) progression.

Cm, Fm, Cm, Gm

A full production example of a Cm, Fm, Cm, G (i iv i V) progression.

Cm, Fm, Cm, G

A Secondary Benefit of Inserting a Major Dominant Chord into a Minor Chord Progression

Another benefit of using the dominant major chord (V) in a minor scale is that the V has a stronger pull towards a resolution the tonic (i) compared to the minor v chord. This a common technique used by songwriters in all genres of music, and something I picked up from Max Martin.

This Is the Emotion of a Dominant Chord

We all have experience the following example even if we didn’t know it at the moment: 

The feeling of un-fulfillment after the end of a song, Or maybe you had the change of witness a musician playing his instrument and when he suddenly stopped, you were left loaning for more; wanting a sense of musical closure.

If you have then probably the song ended on the dominant or subdominant chord!

The dominant (V) chord gives us the feeling that we are abutting to explore a new and untravelled path. That’s why when we hear the sound of a dominant chord we feel the desire for things not to change which then is followed by the anticipated resolution of the tonic (I) chord.

Listen to the example below to experience the desire for closure and resolution

An example of a progression closing on a V chord

Now listen to this example to experience the feeling of closure that comes after a V chord

An example of a progression closing on a I chord

This Is the Emotion of a Secondary Dominant Chord

Before I show you an example of what a secondary dominant chord is this first define these types of chords: 

A secondary dominant chord is a chord we use to reach a non-tonic chord (all chords are non-tonic except the “I” chord) with elevated power and urgency.

Here is an example, in the scale of A major. Let’s say we want to reach the V (E) chord of the A major scale, but we like to approach the V chord through a secondary dominant chord. 

The way to do that is by playing the V chord of the V chord we want to reach, in our case that would be the B chord (V/V) of the E chord (V)

Here is the example illustrated:

A B E
I, V/V, V

If we chose to, we could also use the V7 chord of the V chord, which would make our B a B7 chord.

A B7 E
I, V/V7, V

Pro Trick: Make Any Song Written in Major Sound Very-Very Blue

There is a trick I know that can instantly transform your major key-based song into a very emotional and sad composition.

As we know a major scale has minor and major chords. Let’s take the C major scale as an example,

C – Dm – Em – F – G – Am – Bm
I ii iii IV V vi vii

Here we can see that the C major scale has 4 minor chords

Dm, Em, Am, and Bm (Bm is actually a diminished chord). 

But what is really remarkable is that not all minor chords sound equally sad!

The much popular I-vi-IV-V progression still sounds happy even with the vi chord in it, but let’s compare that progression to the following one: I-iii-vi-IV-V.

I-vi-IV-V progression
I-iii-vi-IV-V progression

As you can hear, there is a big difference between these two progressions. What changed? I just added the iii chord. Listen to the song “Hey there Delilah” by Plain White for a real demonstration.

These Are All the Scales That Exist!

Lastly, as I promised bellow, you can see all the scales (I could gather) that are based on the 12 notes we use in western music.

3-note scales

Minoric

4-note scales

Aeolic
Aeoloric
Aeraphic
Aerathic
Byptic
Dadic
Dalic
Doric
Dygic
Epathic
Epogic
Eporic
Gonic
Ionic
Koptic
Lanic
Lonic
Lothic
Lydic
Mixodoric
Mixolyric
Mynic
Phratic
Phrynic
Pyrric
Rothic
Saric
Stathic
Thaptic
Zoptic
Zyphic

5-note scales

Aeolacritonic
Aeolanitonic
Aeolapritonic
Aeoloditonic
Aeoloritonic
Aeolycritonic
Aeolyphritonic
Aeolyritonic
Aeolythitonic
Aeracritonic
Aeraphitonic
Aerathitonic
Aeritonic
Aeronitonic
Aerophitonic
Aerylitonic
Aerynitonic
Banitonic
Bocritonic
Bogitonic
Bolitonic
Bothitonic
Bycritonic
Bylitonic
Byptitonic
Daditonic
Dalitonic
Danitonic
Daptitonic
Daritonic
Docritonic
Dogitonic
Dolitonic
Doptitonic
Dygitonic
Dynitonic
Dyptitonic
Dyritonic
Epaditonic
Epathitonic
Epogitonic
Epygitonic
Epyritonic
Garitonic
Gathitonic
Golitonic
Gonitonic
Goritonic
Gothitonic
Gycritonic
Gylitonic
Gyritonic
Gythitonic
Ionacritonic
Ionaditonic
Ionagitonic
Ionalitonic
Ionaritonic
Ionitonic
Ionoditonic
Ionothitonic
Ionycritonic
Ionyptitonic
Ionythitonic
Kagitonic
Kanitonic
Kataditonic
Katagitonic
Kataritonic
Katycritonic
Koditonic
Koptitonic
Kygitonic
Kyritonic
Laditonic
Lagitonic
Lanitonic
Laritonic
Lonitonic
Loptitonic
Loritonic
Lothitonic
Lycritonic
Lyditonic
Magitonic
Mixitonic
Mocritonic
Mogitonic
Molitonic
Mothitonic
Myditonic
Mynitonic
Mythitonic
Pagitonic
Palitonic
Paptitonic
Pathitonic
Pentatonic
Phraditonic
Phralitonic
Phratonic
Phrolitonic
Phronitonic
Phropitonic
Phrothitonic
Phrynitonic
Phrythitonic
Poditonic
Poritonic
Pynitonic
Pyritonic
Raditonic
Ragitonic
Ranitonic
Rocritonic
Rolitonic
Rothitonic
Ryphitonic
Saritonic
Sogitonic
Soptitonic
Staditonic
Staptitonic
Stathitonic
Stolitonic
Stonitonic
Stothitonic
Styditonic
Sylitonic
Syptitonic
Thacritonic
Thalitonic
Thaptitonic
Thocritonic
Thoditonic
Tholitonic
Thonitonic
Thoptitonic
Thyritonic
Zacritonic
Zagitonic
Zalitonic
Zanitonic
Zaptitonic
Zaritonic
Zathitonic
Zoditonic
Zogitonic
Zolitonic
Zoptitonic
Zothitonic
Zyditonic
Zylitonic
Zynitonic
Zythitonic

6-note scales

Aeoladimic
Aeolanimic
Aeolaphimic
Aeolaptimic
Aeolathimic
Aeolimic
Aeolocrimic
Aeolodimic
Aeologimic
Aeolonimic
Aeoloptimic
Aeolorimic
Aeolothimic
Aeolycrimic
Aeolydimic
Aeolygimic
Aeolyphimic
Aeolythimic
Aeracrimic
Aeradimic
Aeragimic
Aeralimic
Aeranimic
Aeraptimic
Aerathimic
Aerodimic
Aerogimic
Aeronimic
Aeronimic
Aerothimic
Aerycrimic
Aerygimic
Aerylimic
Aerynimic
Bacrimic
Bagimic
Banimic
Baptimic
Barimic
Bocrimic
Bogimic
Bolimic
Boptimic
Borimic
Bothimic
Bycrimic
Bygimic
Bylimic
Byptimic
Byrimic
Bythimic
Dacrimic
Dadimic
Dagimic
Dalimic
Danimic
Daptimic
Darimic
Dathimic
Docrimic
Dodimic
Dolimic
Donimic
Dorimic
Dycrimic
Dygimic
Dylimic
Dynimic
Dyptimic
Dyrimic
Epacrimic
Epadimic
Epagimic
Epalimic
Eparimic
Epathimic
Epatimic
Epogimic
Epolimic
Eponimic
Eporimic
Epothimic
Epycrimic
Epygimic
Epylimic
Epynimic
Epyrimic
Epythimic
Epytimic
Gacrimic
Gadimic
Galimic
Ganimic
Gaptimic
Garimic
Gathimic
Gocrimic
Gogimic
Golimic
Gonimic
Gycrimic
Gygimic
Gylimic
Gynimic
Gyrimic
Gythimic
Ionacrimic
Ionadimic
Ionagimic
Ionalimic
Ionaphimic
Ionaptimic
Ionarimic
Ionathimic
Ionocrimic
Ionodimic
Ionogimic
Ionolimic
Ionophimic
Ionorimic
Ionothimic
Ionycrimic
Ionygimic
Ionylimic
Ionynimic
Ionyptimic
Ionythimic
Kadimic
Kagimic
Kanimic
Kaptimic
Katadimic
Katagimic
Katalimic
Katanimic
Kataptimic
Katarimic
Katathimic
Kathimic
Katocrimic
Katolimic
Katonimic
Katoptimic
Katorimic
Katothimic
Katycrimic
Katygimic
Katynimic
Katyrimic
Katythimic
Kocrimic
Kodimic
Kolimic
Koptimic
Korimic
Kothimic
Kycrimic
Kydimic
Kygimic
Kylimic
Kynimic
Kyptimic
Kyrimic
Ladimic
Lagimic
Lalimic
Lanimic
Laptimic
Larimic
Lathimic
Locrimic
Lodimic
Logimic
Lolimic
Lonimic
Loptimic
Lorimic
Lothimic
Lycrimic
Lydimic
Lygimic
Lylimic
Lynimic
Lyptimic
Lyrimic
Lythimic
Macrimic
Madimic
Malimic
Manimic
Marimic
Mixolimic
Mocrimic
Modimic
Mogimic
Molimic
Monimic
Morimic
Mothimic
Mycrimic
Mydimic
Mynimic
Mythimic
Padimic
Pagimic
Palimic
Panimic
Paptimic
Parimic
Pathimic
Phracrimic
Phradimic
Phragimic
Phralimic
Phraptimic
Phrathimic
Phrocrimic
Phrogimic
Phrolimic
Phronimic
Phrothimic
Phrycrimic
Phrydimic
Phrygimic
Phrylimic
Phrynimic
Phryptimic
Phrythimic
Podimic
Pogimic
Polimic
Ponimic
Poptimic
Porimic
Pothimic
Pygimic
Pylimic
Pynimic
Pyrimic
Radimic
Ragimic
Ralimic
Ranimic
Raptimic
Rathimic
Rocrimic
Rodimic
Rogimic
Ronimic
Rorimic
Rothimic
Rycrimic
Rygimic
Rylimic
Rynimic
Ryrimic
Rythimic
Sagimic
Salimic
Saptimic
Sarimic
Sathimic
Socrimic
Sogimic
Solimic
Sonimic
Soptimic
Sorimic
Sothimic
Stadimic
Stagimic
Stalimic
Staptimic
Starimic
Stathimic
Stodimic
Stogimic
Stolimic
Stonimic
Stoptimic
Stothimic
Stycrimic
Stydimic
Stygimic
Stylimic
Stynimic
Stythimic
Sycrimic
Sydimic
Sygimic
Sylimic
Synimic
Syptimic
Syrimic
Sythimic
Thacrimic
Thagimic
Thalimic
Thanimic
Thaptimic
Tharimic
Thathimic
Thocrimic
Thodimic
Thogimic
Tholimic
Thonimic
Thoptimic
Thothimic
Thycrimic
Thydimic
Thylimic
Thynimic
Thyptimic
Thyrimic
Whole Tone Scale
Zacrimic
Zadimic
Zagimic
Zalimic
Zanimic
Zaptimic
Zarimic
Zathimic
Zodimic
Zogimic
Zolimic
Zoptimic
Zothimic
Zycrimic
Zydimic
Zygimic
Zylimic
Zynimic
Zyptimic
Zyrimic
Zythimic

7-note scales

Aeodian
Aeolacrian
Aeoladian
Aeolagian
Aeolanian
Aeolaptian
Aeolarian
Aeolathian
Aeolian
Aeolocrian
Aeolodian
Aeologian
Aeolonian
Aeoloptian
Aeolorian
Aeolothian
Aeolycrian
Aeolydian
Aeolygian
Aeolylian
Aeolynian
Aeolyptian
Aeolyrian
Aeolythian
Aeopian
Aeracrian
Aeradian
Aeragian
Aeralian
Aeranian
Aeraphian
Aeraptian
Aerathian
Aerocrian
Aerodian
Aerogian
Aerolian
Aeronian
Aeroptian
Aerorian
Aerothian
Aerycrian
Aerygian
Aerylian
Aerynian
Aeryptian
Aeryrian
Ascending Melodic Minor
Bacrian
Badian
Bagian
Banian
Baptian
Barian
Bathian
Bocrian
Bogian
Bolian
Bonian
Boptian
Borian
Bothian
Bycrian
Bydian
Bygian
Bylian
Bynian
Byptian
Byrian
Bythian
Dacrian
Dadian
Dagian
Dalian
Danian
Daptian
Darian
Dathian
Docrian
Dodian
Dogian
Dolian
Donian
Doptian
Dorian
Dothian
Dycrian
Dydian
Dygian
Dylian
Dynian
Dyptian
Dyrian
Epacrian
Epadian
Epagian
Epalian
Epanian
Epaptian
Eparian
Epathian
Epocrian
Epodian
Epogian
Epolian
Eponian
Eporian
Epothian
Epycrian
Epydian
Epygian
Epylian
Epynian
Epyphian
Epyrian
Epythian
Gacrian
Gadian
Galian
Gamian
Ganian
Gaptian
Garian
Gathian
Gocrian
Godian
Gogian
Golian
Gonian
Gorian
Gothian
Gycrian
Gydian
Gylian
Gynian
Gyphian
Gyptian
Gyrian
Harmonic Minor
Ionacrian
Ionadian
Ionagian
Ionalian
Ionanian
Ionaptian
Ionarian
Ionathian
Ionian
Ionocrian
Ionodian
Ionogian
Ionolian
Ionopian
Ionorian
Ionothian
Ionycrian
Ionydian
Ionygian
Ionylian
Ionyphian
Ionyptian
Ionyrian
Ionythian
Kadian
Kagian
Kalian
Kanian
Kaptian
Karian
Katacrian
Katadian
Katagian
Katalian
Katanian
Kataptian
Katarian
Katathian
Kathian
Katocrian
Katodian
Katogian
Katolian
Katonian
Katoptian
Katorian
Katothian
Katycrian
Katydian
Katygian
Katylian
Katynian
Katyptian
Katyrian
Katythian
Kocrian
Kodian
Kogian
Kolian
Konian
Koptian
Korian
Kothian
Kycrian
Kydian
Kygian
Kylian
Kynian
Kyptian
Kyrian
Kythian
Ladian
Lagian
Lalian
Lanian
Laptian
Larian
Lathian
Locrian
Lodian
Logian
Lolian
Lonian
Loptian
Lorian
Lothian
Lycrian
Lydian
Lygian
Lylian
Lynian
Lyptian
Lyrian
Lythian
Macrian
Madian
Magian
Malian
Manian
Marian
Mathian
Mixodorian
Mixolocrian
Mixolydian
Mixolythian
Mixonorian
Mixonyphian
Mixopyrian
Mocrian
Modian
Mogian
Molian
Monian
Moptian
Morian
Mothian
Mycrian
Mydian
Mygian
Mylian
Myptian
Myrian
Mythian
Pacrian
Padian
Pagian
Palian
Panian
Paptian
Parian
Pathian
Phradian
Phragian
Phralian
Phraptian
Phrathian
Phrocrian
Phrodian
Phrogian
Phrolian
Phronian
Phroptian
Phrorian
Phrothian
Phrycrian
Phrydian
Phrygian
Phrylian
Phrynian
Phryptian
Phryrian
Phrythian
Podian
Pogian
Polian
Ponian
Porian
Pothian
Pycrian
Pydian
Pygian
Pylian
Pynian
Pyptian
Pyrian
Pythian
Radian
Ragian
Ralian
Ranian
Raptian
Rarian
Rathian
Rodian
Rogian
Rolian
Ronian
Rorian
Rothian
Rycrian
Rydian
Rygian
Rylian
Rynian
Ryphian
Rythian
Sadian
Sagian
Salian
Sanian
Saptian
Sarian
Sathian
Socrian
Sodian
Sogian
Solian
Sonian
Soptian
Sorian
Sothian
Stacrian
Stadian
Stagian
Stalian
Stanian
Staptian
Starian
Stathian
Stocrian
Stodian
Stogian
Stolian
Stonian
Stoptian
Storian
Stothian
Stycrian
Stydian
Stygian
Stylian
Stynian
Styrian
Stythian
Sycrian
Sydian
Sygian
Sylian
Synian
Syptian
Syrian
Sythian
Thacrian
Thadian
Thagian
Thalian
Thanian
Tharian
Thocrian
Thodian
Thogian
Tholian
Thonian
Thoptian
Thorian
Thycrian
Thydian
Thygian
Thylian
Thynian
Thyrian
Zacrian
Zadian
Zagian
Zalian
Zanian
Zaptian
Zarian
Zathian
Zocrian
Zodian
Zogian
Zolian
Zonian
Zoptian
Zothian
Zycrian
Zydian
Zygian
Zylian
Zynian
Zyptian
Zyrian
Zythian

8-note scales

Aeodyllic
Aeolacryllic
Aeoladyllic
Aeolanyllic
Aeolaptyllic
Aeolaryllic
Aeolathyllic
Aeolocryllic
Aeologyllic
Aeoloryllic
Aeolothyllic
Aeolydyllic
Aeolynyllic
Aeolyryllic
Aeonyllic
Aeoryllic
Aeoryllic
Aeradyllic
Aeralyllic
Aeranyllic
Aeraptyllic
Aerathyllic
Aerocryllic
Aerogyllic
Aerolyllic
Aeronyllic
Aeroptyllic
Aerothyllic
Aerycryllic
Aerygyllic
Aerylyllic
Aerynyllic
Aeryptyllic
Aerythyllic
Bacryllic
Badyllic
Bagyllic
Banyllic
Baryllic
Bocryllic
Bodyllic
Bonyllic
Boptyllic
Bothyllic
Bycryllic
Bydyllic
Bygyllic
Bynyllic
Byptyllic
Bythyllic
Dacryllic
Dadyllic
Dagyllic
Danyllic
Daptyllic
Daryllic
Dathyllic
Dodyllic
Dogyllic
Dolyllic
Dothyllic
Dycryllic
Dydyllic
Dygyllic
Dynyllic
Dyryllic
Dythyllic
Epadyllic
Epagyllic
Epanyllic
Epaphyllic
Epaptyllic
Eparyllic
Epicryllic
Epidyllic
Epigyllic
Epilyllic
Epinyllic
Epiphyllic
Epiryllic
Epocryllic
Epogyllic
Eponyllic
Eporyllic
Epothyllic
Epotyllic
Gadyllic
Galyllic
Ganyllic
Gaptyllic
Gocryllic
Godyllic
Gonyllic
Goptyllic
Goryllic
Gothyllic
Gycryllic
Gydyllic
Gygyllic
Gylyllic
Gynyllic
Gyptyllic
Gyryllic
Gythyllic
Ionanyllic
Ionaptyllic
Ionaryllic
Ionathyllic
Ionidyllic
Ionilyllic
Ioninyllic
Ioniptyllic
Ionocryllic
Ionodyllic
Ionogyllic
Iononyllic
Ionoptyllic
Ionoryllic
Ionothyllic
Ionyllic
Ionyryllic
Kadyllic
Kagyllic
Kalyllic
Kaptyllic
Katadyllic
Katagyllic
Katalyllic
Kataptyllic
Kataryllic
Katocryllic
Katodyllic
Katogyllic
Katolyllic
Katoptyllic
Katoryllic
Katycryllic
Katydyllic
Katygyllic
Katylyllic
Katynyllic
Katyryllic
Kocryllic
Kodyllic
Kogyllic
Kolyllic
Kycryllic
Kydyllic
Ladyllic
Lalyllic
Laptyllic
Laryllic
Lodyllic
Logyllic
Lolyllic
Lonyllic
Loptyllic
Loryllic
Lothyllic
Lydyllic
Lygyllic
Lylyllic
Lynyllic
Lyryllic
Lythyllic
Madyllic
Magyllic
Manyllic
Maptyllic
Maryllic
Mathyllic
Mixodyllic
Mixonyllic
Mixoryllic
Mixotharyllic
Mixothyllic
Mocryllic
Modyllic
Mogyllic
Molyllic
Monyllic
Moptyllic
Moryllic
Mothyllic
Mycryllic
Mygyllic
Mylyllic
Mythyllic
Padyllic
Palyllic
Panyllic
Paptyllic
Pathyllic
Phracryllic
Phradyllic
Phragyllic
Phralyllic
Phranyllic
Phraptyllic
Phrathyllic
Phrocryllic
Phrodyllic
Phrolyllic
Phronyllic
Phroptyllic
Phroryllic
Phrycryllic
Phrydyllic
Phrygyllic
Phrylyllic
Phryptyllic
Phryryllic
Pocryllic
Podyllic
Polyllic
Ponyllic
Poptyllic
Poryllic
Pothyllic
Pycryllic
Pygyllic
Pylyllic
Pynyllic
Pyryllic
Pythyllic
Racryllic
Radyllic
Ragyllic
Raptyllic
Raryllic
Rathyllic
Rocryllic
Rodyllic
Rogyllic
Rolyllic
Ronyllic
Roryllic
Rothyllic
Rycryllic
Rydyllic
Rygyllic
Rynyllic
Ryptyllic
Ryryllic
Rythyllic
Sacryllic
Sadyllic
Sagyllic
Salyllic
Sanyllic
Saptyllic
Saryllic
Sathyllic
Socryllic
Sodyllic
Solyllic
Sonyllic
Soryllic
Stacryllic
Stadyllic
Stagyllic
Stalyllic
Stanyllic
Staptyllic
Staryllic
Stathyllic
Stodyllic
Stogyllic
Stolyllic
Stonyllic
Stoptyllic
Storyllic
Stycryllic
Stydyllic
Stygyllic
Stynyllic
Styptyllic
Styryllic
Stythyllic
Sydyllic
Sylyllic
Syryllic
Sythyllic
Thacryllic
Thadyllic
Thagyllic
Thalyllic
Thanyllic
Tharyllic
Thocryllic
Thodyllic
Thogyllic
Tholyllic
Thoptyllic
Thydyllic
Thynyllic
Thyphyllic
Thyptyllic
Thyryllic
Zacryllic
Zadyllic
Zalyllic
Zanyllic
Zaryllic
Zathyllic
Zocryllic
Zogyllic
Zolyllic
Zonyllic
Zoptyllic
Zoryllic
Zothyllic
Zycryllic
Zydyllic
Zygyllic
Zylyllic
Zynyllic
Zyptyllic
Zyryllic
Zythyllic

9-note scales

Aeolacrygic
Aeolanygic
Aeolarygic
Aeolathygic
Aeolocrygic
Aeolonygic
Aeolorygic
Aeolygic
Aeolynygic
Aeolyrygic
Aeradygic
Aeralygic
Aeranygic
Aerocrygic
Aeroptygic
Aerycrygic
Aerygic
Aerynygic
Aerythygic
Bacrygic
Badygic
Bagygic
Barygic
Bodygic
Boptygic
Bycrygic
Byptygic
Bythygic
Danygic
Darygic
Dathygic
Diminished Scale
Dodygic
Doptygic
Dothygic
Dycrygic
Dydygic
Dyrygic
Eparygic
Epidygic
Epilygic
Epinygic
Epithygic
Epitygic
Epocrygic
Epolygic
Eporygic
Epyrygic
Gadygic
Galygic
Gaptygic
Garygic
Gocrygic
Godygic
Goptygic
Gothygic
Gycrygic
Gyptygic
Gythygic
Ionidygic
Ionilygic
Ionocrygic
Ionodygic
Ionogygic
Ionoptygic
Ionygic
Kalygic
Kaptygic
Katagygic
Katalygic
Katarygic
Katodygic
Katorygic
Katycrygic
Katygic
Katylygic
Katynygic
Kodygic
Koptygic
Kynygic
Kyrygic
Lacrygic
Ladygic
Laptygic
Lonygic
Loptygic
Lothygic
Lydygic
Lynygic
Lyrygic
Lythygic
Madygic
Manygic
Marygic
Mathygic
Mixodygic
Mixolygic
Mocrygic
Modygic
Monygic
Moptygic
Mothygic
Mycrygic
Mylygic
Padygic
Panygic
Phradygic
Phrathygic
Phrocrygic
Phronygic
Phroptygic
Phrygic
Polygic
Porygic
Pothygic
Pylygic
Pyrygic
Radygic
Raphygic
Raptygic
Rocrygic
Rodygic
Rycrygic
Rynygic
Ryptygic
Sacrygic
Sadygic
Sarygic
Sathygic
Solygic
Sorygic
Stadygic
Stalygic
Stanygic
Staptygic
Starygic
Stodygic
Stonygic
Stophygic
Stynygic
Styptygic
Styrygic
Sydygic
Sylygic
Sythygic
Thacrygic
Thadygic
Thaptygic
Tharygic
Thocrygic
Tholygic
Thophygic
Thydygic
Thyptygic
Zacrygic
Zanygic
Zathygic
Zodygic
Zolygic
Zothygic
Zycrygic
Zydygic
Zylygic
Zynygic
Zyphygic
Zyrygic

10-note scales

Aeogyllian
Aeoryllian
Aeradyllian
Aerycryllian
Aerygyllian
Bacryllian
Bagyllian
Bathyllian
Boptyllian
Dagyllian
Danyllian
Dathyllian
Dodyllian
Dycryllian
Dydyllian
Epinyllian
Epiryllian
Epityllian
Epocryllian
Gadyllian
Garyllian
Godyllian
Goptyllian
Gothyllian
Ionyllian
Katagyllian
Kataphyllian
Katodyllian
Katogyllian
Katoryllian
Katyllian
Loptyllian
Lyryllian
Lythyllian
Madyllian
Mathyllian
Mixodyllian
Mogyllian
Phradyllian
Ragyllian
Rocryllian
Rygyllian
Ryptyllian
Sagyllian
Solyllian
Soryllian
Staptyllian
Styptyllian
Sydyllian
Thogyllian
Thydyllian
Zogyllian
Zolyllian
Zyphyllian
Zyryllian

11-note scales

Aeolatic
Aerycratic
Eptatic
Godatic
Mixolatic
Monatic
Solatic
Soratic
Thydatic
Zylatic

12-note scales

Chromatic

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